Room for Change

Posted by & filed under Blog.

The Pike Street Hill Climb is made up of 163 stairs connecting Alaskan Way and 1st Avenue. Since its construction in 1977, the Hill Climb has served as a vital connection between the waterfront and Pike Place Market — 375 feet of steps surrounded by restaurants and bars, shops and vendors. In 2016 Friends of… Read more »

Green Acres

Posted by & filed under Blog.

There are roughly 127 neighborhoods in Seattle. Pockets of homes and businesses with their own distinct names and histories. Ballard has deep Scandinavian roots. Italian and Japanese immigrants developed farms on Beacon Hill. Long before the Kingdome and the Mariners, the Seattle Pilots played big league baseball in Rainier Valley. The Seattle waterfront also has… Read more »

A Canvas with a View

Posted by & filed under Blog.

Explore the deep archives of Seattle waterfront history and you’ll find Piers 62 and 63 have changed names a number of times over the years. Pier 62 was originally known as Pier 9 when it was constructed in 1901. Five years later, Pier 63 — then known as Pier 10 — was built next door…. Read more »

Pitch on the Pier

Posted by & filed under Blog.

A Major League Soccer pitch is between 110-120 yards long and 70-80 yards wide. Obviously, that’s a big, big field — but that’s not stopping Seattle’s beloved Sounders FC from bringing soccer to the Waterfront Park. Okay, so they’re not exactly bringing a full pitch. Or even a smaller version, really. Instead, they’re bringing something… Read more »

Designing a Hot Spot for Seattle

Posted by & filed under Blog.

When plans for the reimagined Seattle waterfront were beginning to take shape, there was a great public interest in creating a park which serves as a cultural space for the city. With 26 blocks of park promenade and a nine acre central public space, opportunities abound to achieve that great mixing chamber a park can… Read more »

A Sturdy Spine for a Transformed Waterfront

Posted by & filed under Blog.

Once completed in 2018, the replaced Elliott Bay Seawall will be a triumph of engineering and design. It will also place Seattle as a leader when it comes to implementing major infrastructure that actively benefits habitats and ecology. That’s not to say the old seawall was sub-par. Far from it. Constructed in 1934, the original… Read more »

Transforming Seattle — An Interview with Geologist and Author David Williams

Posted by & filed under Blog.

  Remaking and reclaiming the Seattle waterfront is a large-scale civic project. But it’s not the biggest project our city has undertaken. Before his lecture at Friends of Waterfront Seattle on March 10, author and geologist David Williams talked with Friends Ambassador Rachel Gallaher about his book “Too High & Too Steep: Reshaping Seattle’s Topography,”… Read more »

Winter Fishing by Barbara Earl Thomas

Posted by & filed under Blog.

  Friends had the distinct pleasure of hosting local artist and writer Barbara Earl Thomas at a recent gathering at Waterfront Space, where she shared her essay “Winter Fishing.” The ideas that came through Barbara’s reading remind us that as a waterfront city, our connection to the water is both physical and psychic. A community’s… Read more »

Hot Spot, by Jordan Monez

Posted by & filed under Blog.

“To create architecture in the city is to build places and give life to ‘time’ (i.e. past, present, and future).” – Fumihiko Maki  We are so excited about the vision of the completed waterfront project already underway with construction of the new Elliott Bay seawall. However, projects of this scale take years, which is why… Read more »

Let’s Get Excited, by Liat Uziyel-Bollag

Posted by & filed under Blog.

Friends, there are so many reasons to get excited about Waterfront Seattle and we look forward to highlighting our grounds for joy with a series of different perspectives and insights from Friends of Waterfront Seattle. Sitting, thinking about the city’s central waterfront, it’s hard not to appreciate the gribble creatures who have eaten away at… Read more »